Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust

Fat & Proteins & Carbs

Macronutrients are made up of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Their purpose is to provide energy to our body and to ensure the proper functioning of vital functions. A good distribution of macros, according to its needs, its morphology and its physical activity, allows to optimize its results, whether it is within the framework of a weight loss or a muscle gain.

100 g = 277 Calories

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust belongs to the Baked Foods food group.
You have 277 calories from 100 grams.The serving weight is 150g1 piece, NFS which is equivalent to 416 calories.

Percent Daily Value

The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet.
You can get an estimate of the number of calories you need daily based on criteria such as age, gender, weight, height and activity on our calculator

Women

277 Calories = 14% of Daily Value

DVs are based on a 2,000-calorie diet for healthy adults women.

Men

277 Calories = 11% of Daily Value

DVs are based on a 2,500-calorie diet for healthy adults men.

Estimated amounts of calories needed

.Calories needed to maintain the energy balance of different age groups at three different levels of physical activity.

  • Sedentary means a lifestyle that includes only light physical activity associated with typical daily living.
  • Moderately active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking approximately 1.5 to 3 miles per day at a speed of 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical daily living.
  • Active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking more than 3 miles per day at a speed of 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical daily living.

How long would it take to burn off 277 calories?

Everyone’s metabolism is responsible for turning food into energy. Being a natural process of our body, metabolism is best activated by exercise to burn calories. Some factors that define this process are body structure, gender and age.

How Long Does It Take to Burn 277 calories for a 125-pound person :

Aerobics. Step: high impact: 23 mn
Swimming: general : 38 mn
Basketball: wheelchair : 36 mn
Chopping & splitting wood : 38 mn
Standing in line : 237 mn

How Long Does It Take to Burn 277 calories for a 155-pound person :

Weight Lifting: vigorous : 38 mn
Gymnastics: general : 58 mn
Tennis: general : 33 mn
Bicycling: > 20 mph : 14 mn
Standing in line : 237 mn

How Long Does It Take to Burn 277 calories for a 185-pound person :

Aerobics: high impact : 28 mn
Gymnastics: general : 49 mn
Tennis: general : 28 mn
Bicycling: > 20 mph : 49 mn
Standing in line : 99 mn

Comparison with ordinary products

This table lists the amount of calories in 100g of different everyday foods. For the same amount you can easily compare the calories of these foods with Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust. For information, 100g of Nutella contains 539 calories, 100g of French Fries contains 312 calories, 100g of Pizza contains 266 calories, 100g of Chicken contains 239 calories, 100g of Pasta contains 131 calories, 100g of Rice contains 130c calories, 100g of Banana contains 89 calories.

Pros and Cons

With 277 calories per 100 grams, Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust would be considered a Medium calorie density food.

High Niacin density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in Niacin B3, an average adults needs 16 mg of Niacin B3 per day. 100 grams have 4.541 mg of Niacin B3, 28% of your total daily needs.

High Protein density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in Protein, an average adults needs 50 g of Protein per day. 100 grams have 14.05 g of Protein, 28% of your total daily needs.

High Saturated_Fats density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in Saturated_Fats, an average adults needs 20 g of Saturated_Fatss per day. 100 grams have 5.335 g of Saturated_Fats, 27% of your total daily needs.

High Selenium density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in Selenium, an average adults needs 55 mcg of Selenium per day. 100 grams have 21 mcg of Selenium, 38% of your total daily needs.

High sodium density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in sodium, an average adults needs 2,300 mg of sodium per day. 100 grams have 603 mg of salt, 26% of your total daily needs.

High Thiamin density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in Thiamin B1, an average adults needs 1.2 g of Thiamin B1 per day. 100 grams have 0.359 mg of Thiamin B1, 30% of your total daily needs.

High Vitamin B12 density

Pizza With Extra Meat Regular Crust is high in Vitamin B12, an average adults needs 2.4 mcg of Vitamin B12 per day. 100 grams have 0.62 mcg of Vitamin B12, 26% of your total daily needs.

Quick stats

These quick stats highlight the main nutritional characteristics of Pillsbury Golden Layer Buttermilk Biscuits Artificial Flavor Refrigerated Dough

Nutrition Facts

The Nutrition Facts label is required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on most packaged foods and beverages. The Nutrition Facts label provides detailed information about the nutrient content of a food, such as the amount of fat, sugar, sodium and fibre it contains.

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 100g

,

Calories 277Calories from Fat 112
% Daily Value*14
Total Fat 12.46 g16%
Satured Fat 5.335 g27%
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 30 mg10%
Sodium 603 mg26%
Total Carbohydrate 26.73 g10%
Dietary Fiber 1.8 g6%
Sugars 2.94 g6%
Protein 14.05 g28%
Vitamin A 6%Vitamin C 1%
Calcium 12%Iron 13%

Nutrition Elements by %DV

Macronutrients by Daily Value (%DV)

Minerals by Daily Value (%DV)

Vitamins by Daily Value (%DV)

Nutrition Elements Summary

Macronutrients

Minerals

Vitamins

Others

Carbs and Sugars

Fats

Amino Acids

Glossary

Source: Nutrient data for this listing was provided by USDA
Calcium is by far the most abundant metallic element in the body (1 to 2% by mass). It is mainly stored in the bones, of which it is an integral part. It contributes to the formation of the latter, as well as that of the teeth, and to the maintenance of their health. The mechanisms for maintaining a normal plasma ionized calcium concentration are, if necessary, at the expense of the skeleton and too great a decrease in calcium intake as well as an increase in excretion poses a risk to the skeleton and health. (osteoporosis in adults, rickets in children, increased risk of lead poisoning, etc.).
Calcium also plays an essential role in blood clotting, the maintenance of blood pressure and the contraction of muscles, including the heart, through its importance in neuromuscular functions. It is involved in the functioning of many enzymatic processes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium

Copper is a trace element essential for life (humans, plants, animals, and micro-organisms). The human body normally contains copper at a concentration of about 1.4 to 2.1 mg per kg. Copper is found in the liver, muscles and bones. Copper is carried in the bloodstream by means of a protein called ceruleoplasmin71. After copper is absorbed from the intestine, it is transported to the liver, bound to albumin. The metabolism and excretion of copper is controlled by the delivery of ceruleoplasmin to the liver, and the copper is excreted in the bile. At the cellular level, copper is present in a number of enzymes and proteins, including cytochrome c oxidase and certain superoxide dismutases (SOD). Copper is used for the biological transport of electrons, e.g. the “copper blue” proteins, azurine and plastocyanine. The name “copper blue” comes from their intense blue color due to an absorption band (around 600 nm) by ligand / metal charge transfer (LMCT). Many mollusks and some arthropods, such as horseshoe crab, use a copper-based pigment, hemocyanin, for oxygen transport, rather than hemoglobin, which has an iron nucleus, and their blood is therefore blue, and not red, when it is oxygenated72.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper

Fat is one of the three main groups of macronutrients in the human diet, along with carbohydrates and protein, and the main components of common food products such as milk, butter, tallow, lard, bacon and cooking oils. They are an important and dense source of food energy for many animals and play important structural and metabolic functions in most living things, including energy storage, waterproofing, and thermal insulation. The human body can produce the fat it needs from other food ingredients except for a few essential fatty acids which must be included in the diet. Dietary fats are also the carriers of certain flavor and aroma ingredients and vitamins which are not soluble in water.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat

Vitamin B9, another name for folic acid (folate, folacin or vitamin M, pteroyl-L-glutamic acid, pteroyl-L-glutamate and pteroylmonoglutamic acid), is a water soluble vitamin.
Folic acid is the metabolic precursor of a coenzyme, tetrahydrofolate (FH4 or THF4), involved in particular in the synthesis of nucleic bases, purines and pyrimidines, constituting the nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) of the genetic material. THF is also involved in the synthesis of amino acids such as methionine, histidine and serine.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folate

Iron is a trace element and is one of the essential mineral salts found in food, but can be toxic in some forms. An iron deficiency is a source of anemia and can affect the cognitive and socio-emotional development of the childs brain or exacerbate the effects of certain intoxications (lead poisoning, for example).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron

B vitamins facilitate the conversion of food (carbohydrates) into energy (glucose). Niacin is helpful in the process of regulating stress hormones and improves blood circulation. These vitamins are water soluble and the body does not store them.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niacin

Inorganic phosphorus in the form of the phosphate PO3−4 is required for all known forms of life. Phosphorus plays a major role in the structural framework of DNA and RNA. Living cells use phosphate to transport cellular energy with adenosine triphosphate (ATP), necessary for every cellular process that uses energy. ATP is also important for phosphorylation, a key regulatory event in cells. Phospholipids are the main structural components of all cellular membranes. Calcium phosphate salts assist in stiffening bones. Biochemists commonly use the abbreviation “Pi” to refer to inorganic phosphate.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphorus

Proteins are assemblages of amino acids, 9 of which are essential for the body. There are two sources of protein sources: proteins of animal origin and proteins of plant origin.Proteins are essential for all functions of the body because they provide amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks of all body tissues, including muscle and body tissues. Eating protein at every meal can also make you feel full for a longer period of time.
Whether you eat protein to lose fat, gain muscle, or both, it is important to look for lean protein, or protein that contains very little fat. Some fats are important (see next section), but the type of fat is very important, so not all fat-rich proteins are equally healthy. Examples of lean proteins include skinless chicken, tuna, tilapia, extra-lean ground beef, egg whites, Greek yogurt and low-fat or fat-free cottage cheese, and tofu.
When reading a label, be sure to check the protein-to-fat ratio. Lean protein has much more protein than fat (for example, egg whites are fat-free but have a lot of protein).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein

Vitamin B2, corresponding to riboflavin, or lactoflavin, is a water-soluble vitamin necessary for the synthesis of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), two cofactors essential to flavoproteins.
Vitamin B2 plays an important role in transforming simple foods (carbohydrates, fats and proteins) into energy. It is involved in the repair metabolism of the muscles.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riboflavin

Saturated fatty acids are lipid molecules in which all carbon atoms carry the maximum possible hydrogen atoms. No hydrogen atoms can be added, the fat is said to be “saturated” and all bonds between carbon atoms are single (no carbon-carbon double bonds).
The impact of saturated fats on the body depends on the food you eat and its quantity. In excess saturated fatty acids form bad cholesterol in the body, which leads to clogged arteries. But, in reasonable amounts, saturated fatty acids are good for the body because they provide energy and vitamins (A, D, E, K).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturated_fat

Selenium is a trace element that is a constituent of selenoproteins, which include the main intracellular antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase . It is found in eggs (16-48% of the average daily requirement, depending on whether it is a duck, chicken, goose or turkey egg and on the farming system) , pork or beef kidneys, garlic, fish and shellfish. Western nutrition more than meets daily requirements for this element , but it is impossible to predict body selenium levels from dietary intake because its utilization and retention are dependent on the presence of folic acid, vitamin B12 and negatively affected by the presence of homocysteine.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selenium

Sodium is a mineral that plays an important role in the body’s state of hydration. It is present in the blood and in the extracellular fluid in which cells are bathed. Sodium also helps maintain the acid-base balance and is essential in the transmission of nerve impulses and muscle contraction. However, in excess it can have deleterious consequences. This is why current recommendations aim to limit sodium consumption.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium

Thiamine or vitamin B1 (or aneurine) is a metabolic precursor of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a coenzyme essential to certain decarboxylases. In animals, thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin from the family of B vitamins that they must find in their diet. On the other hand, it is synthesized by bacteria, plants and fungi. It is essential for the transformation of carbohydrates into energy by the Krebs cycle and is necessary for the proper functioning of the nervous system and muscles. It is in fact essential for the transformation of pyruvate produced by glycolysis and toxic for the nervous system.
In humans, a dietary vitamin B1 deficiency causes beriberi and can also cause Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiamine

Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin essential to the normal functioning of the brain (it participates in the synthesis of neurotransmitters), the nervous system (it is essential for maintaining the integrity of the nervous system and especially the myelin sheath that protects the nerves and optimizes their functioning) and for the formation of blood. It is one of the eight B vitamins. It is normally involved as a cofactor in the metabolism of every cell in the human body, especially in the synthesis of DNA and its regulation, as well as in the synthesis of fatty acids and in energy production.
It exists in several forms belonging to the cobalamin family: cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin, methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin, the first two being its stable forms. Cobalamins have a chemical structure similar to heme but the central iron atom is replaced by a cobalt atom, hence their name.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_B_12

In very small quantities, zinc in assimilable form is an important trace element, essential to plant and animal organisms. When properly assimilated by organisms, it activates enzymes, influences growth, and promotes biochemical reactions and controls in the lung surfaces. The human body contains 2 g to 4 g. Daily requirements can be estimated at a minimum of 15 mg for a normal man, and up to twice that amount for a nursing woman.
Zinc is contained in a variety of yeasts (up to 100 mg per kilogram), in red beef (in the range of 50 mg to 120 mg per kilogram), and in a variety of commercial foods.
The bioavailability of zinc in food is not known. The bioavailability of zinc from plants is sometimes questioned. While it is true that plants contain antinutrients that decrease zinc absorption, zinc deficiency does not appear to be more common among vegans.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zinc